doubledaybooks:

"[O]ne of the most mesmerizing heroines in recent fiction…." —Texas Monthly
"Merritt Tierce’s debut novel, Love Me Back, is a gorgeous, dirty razor of prose—sharp and dangerous and breathtaking." —Roxane Gay, author of An Untamed State and Bad Feminist
"Tierce’s prose possesses the force, bluntness and surprise of a sucker punch. Love Me Back is an unflinching and galvanic novel full of heart and heartache; one of my favorite books of the last few years." —Carrie Brownstein, co-creator of Portlandia 
LOVE ME BACK here.

Do it for the gif.

doubledaybooks:

"[O]ne of the most mesmerizing heroines in recent fiction…." Texas Monthly

"Merritt Tierce’s debut novel, Love Me Back, is a gorgeous, dirty razor of prose—sharp and dangerous and breathtaking." —Roxane Gay, author of An Untamed State and Bad Feminist

"Tierce’s prose possesses the force, bluntness and surprise of a sucker punch. Love Me Back is an unflinching and galvanic novel full of heart and heartache; one of my favorite books of the last few years." —Carrie Brownstein, co-creator of Portlandia

LOVE ME BACK here.

Do it for the gif.

An iconic character in films, plays, and books, Paris has morphed into a destination so romanticized that it’s easy for travelers to be skeptical about the city’s charms. And yet the city’s bridges, bistros, and bookshops inspire wonder time after time—they are just as we imagined, just as we remember them from our favorite movies and magazines.
If a trip to Paris is on the horizon, familiarize yourself with the boulevards and gardens of the French capital through the eyes of writers lucky enough to have called the City of Light home. Here are 10 classic and contemporary books that will transport you to the streets of Paris from page one.

An iconic character in films, plays, and books, Paris has morphed into a destination so romanticized that it’s easy for travelers to be skeptical about the city’s charms. And yet the city’s bridges, bistros, and bookshops inspire wonder time after time—they are just as we imagined, just as we remember them from our favorite movies and magazines.

If a trip to Paris is on the horizon, familiarize yourself with the boulevards and gardens of the French capital through the eyes of writers lucky enough to have called the City of Light home. Here are 10 classic and contemporary books that will transport you to the streets of Paris from page one.

readpenguin:

flavorpill:

In ‘Women in Clothes’ the smartest, most interesting voices discussing fashion through such lenses as gender, class, ethics, and race.

Yes, yes, yes, yes! Read more about sheilaheti, heidijulavits and shaptonia's collaborative, unique new book here

And did you know womeninclothes all began with a survey about personal style, which you can take here?

rachelfershleiser:

rachelfershleiser:

books:

Save the date! Spread the word! And kick off the Brooklyn Book Festival and Bookends week with Tumblr, recommendedreading, penamerican, and buzzfeedbooks!
We’ll have Karl Ove Knausgård “My Struggle” Mad Libs with kickstarter at 8, dancing with DJ sammybananas at 9, and free drinks as long as they last.
Hope to see you there!

Shhh… go to sleep now. You have to party with all of literary internetty Brooklyn tomorrow…

Good morning! See you soon?

rachelfershleiser:

rachelfershleiser:

books:

Save the date! Spread the word! And kick off the Brooklyn Book Festival and Bookends week with Tumblr, recommendedreading, penamerican, and buzzfeedbooks!

We’ll have Karl Ove Knausgård “My Struggle” Mad Libs with kickstarter at 8, dancing with DJ sammybananas at 9, and free drinks as long as they last.

Hope to see you there!

Shhh… go to sleep now. You have to party with all of literary internetty Brooklyn tomorrow…

Good morning! See you soon?

Over at Everyday eBook, we interviewed Tana French about her latest novel, The Secret Place. We didn’t have room for this amazing outtake question, so you, sweet Tumblrers, get to read it first!

EH: One of the things I really loved about The Secret Place and one of the things I don’t see in adult fiction is how seriously it takes the inner lives and the friendships and the relationships among teenage girls. Is that something that you thought needed more representation? And how did you tap into that mindset?
TF: I think teenagers’ lives are really important. You’re dealing with who you are, what you consider important, you’re floundering through all the things that are thrown at you to try to find out your identity, your priorities, what’s the bedrock on which you’re going to build your life. And that’s going to have implications for the whole rest of your life, and I think that does deserve to be taken really, really seriously.
Also the friendships you make as a teenager – and I think this definitely comes out in the book – these friendships last for life and they define who you are. I still have friends from when I was a teenager who, even if I haven’t talked to them in years, we instantly click back to being friends. Because these people know you at your most messed up and confused and silly and ridiculous, and they love you with all that, and there’s nothing that can really change that. No matter who you grow up into, that foundation remains the same, and that’s hugely important.
There’s a scene in The Secret Place where Holly’s mother comes back from having met up with one of her old friends who she’s been out of touch with for decades, and is dizzied by it. She’s completely lightheaded and spinning with the way this friendship is still in place. And the person she was then is still in place after all these years, and it’s impossible to overstate the importance of that, and of those friendships that are in the process of being made when you’re a teenager and that will make you who you are. You find out who you are through these friendships. So yeah, I think that deserves to be taken really, really seriously.
Getting into the mindset was partly just remembering what it was like being a teenager. The bit that’s hardest, that does slip through your fingers – even though at the time you swear it won’t – is the intensity of it, the fever pitch that everything runs at. Everything matters. Everything is either the end of the world, or the transformation of the world, everything just matters so much. That can be hard to remember, because you’re in your thirties, you can’t live at that pitch any more, and it’s hard to remember that you used to live at it all the time.
The other thing that took a bit of work was the slang, because it’s changed in the last twenty years – nobody’s talking the way we used to. So I spent a fair amount of time lurking on websites that are meant for Irish teenagers, or on Facebook accounts, or hanging out at bus stops as school was letting out, dodgily edging nearer to groups of teenage girls. I’m sure I looked like a total weirdo, but this is the thing – I doubt any of them ever noticed I was there. Because when you’re fifteen, a thirty-something-year-old woman doesn’t even exist. You’re not even on their radar – their own world is all that matters. I have kids, so if you’re pushing a buggy you’re just in a different universe, you’re just an obstacle on the footpath.

Over at Everyday eBook, we interviewed Tana French about her latest novel, The Secret Place. We didn’t have room for this amazing outtake question, so you, sweet Tumblrers, get to read it first!

EH: One of the things I really loved about The Secret Place and one of the things I don’t see in adult fiction is how seriously it takes the inner lives and the friendships and the relationships among teenage girls. Is that something that you thought needed more representation? And how did you tap into that mindset?

TF: I think teenagers’ lives are really important. You’re dealing with who you are, what you consider important, you’re floundering through all the things that are thrown at you to try to find out your identity, your priorities, what’s the bedrock on which you’re going to build your life. And that’s going to have implications for the whole rest of your life, and I think that does deserve to be taken really, really seriously.

Also the friendships you make as a teenager – and I think this definitely comes out in the book – these friendships last for life and they define who you are. I still have friends from when I was a teenager who, even if I haven’t talked to them in years, we instantly click back to being friends. Because these people know you at your most messed up and confused and silly and ridiculous, and they love you with all that, and there’s nothing that can really change that. No matter who you grow up into, that foundation remains the same, and that’s hugely important.

There’s a scene in The Secret Place where Holly’s mother comes back from having met up with one of her old friends who she’s been out of touch with for decades, and is dizzied by it. She’s completely lightheaded and spinning with the way this friendship is still in place. And the person she was then is still in place after all these years, and it’s impossible to overstate the importance of that, and of those friendships that are in the process of being made when you’re a teenager and that will make you who you are. You find out who you are through these friendships. So yeah, I think that deserves to be taken really, really seriously.

Getting into the mindset was partly just remembering what it was like being a teenager. The bit that’s hardest, that does slip through your fingers – even though at the time you swear it won’t – is the intensity of it, the fever pitch that everything runs at. Everything matters. Everything is either the end of the world, or the transformation of the world, everything just matters so much. That can be hard to remember, because you’re in your thirties, you can’t live at that pitch any more, and it’s hard to remember that you used to live at it all the time.

The other thing that took a bit of work was the slang, because it’s changed in the last twenty years – nobody’s talking the way we used to. So I spent a fair amount of time lurking on websites that are meant for Irish teenagers, or on Facebook accounts, or hanging out at bus stops as school was letting out, dodgily edging nearer to groups of teenage girls. I’m sure I looked like a total weirdo, but this is the thing – I doubt any of them ever noticed I was there. Because when you’re fifteen, a thirty-something-year-old woman doesn’t even exist. You’re not even on their radar – their own world is all that matters. I have kids, so if you’re pushing a buggy you’re just in a different universe, you’re just an obstacle on the footpath.